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Overview | Organ Shortages Critical | Information for the South Asian Community | Organs by Race?
Asian Attitudes to Organ Donation | Organ Donation and Transplantation - The Multi-Faith Perspective
Important Facts | Our Problem & Our Responsibility | Organs for Sale | One Man's Story
One Man's Story - Ten Years On | Anup Nahar's Story | Walk in Love and Hope
Living Transplants Reach All Time High | Ethnicity & Renal Failure: Disparity or Diversity
Early Management of Renal Failure: Prevention or Prevarication? | Asian Organ Donors Urgently Needed
Kidney Disease: the silent killer affecting YOU - and how to prevent it | The Body Snatchers
SADP Endorses PM'S Proposal for Presumed Consent for Organ Donation
Celebrities Back New Campaign To Urge Asian Communities To Join The NHS Organ Donor Register
New Book - 'Thankyou for Life' | SADP supports Healthtalkonline.org - organ donation & transplantation

One Man's Story - Ten Years On

A personal view 
by Deepak Mahtani

March 25th is a date that will be firmly etched in my mind for the rest of my life and the year 2005 marks the 10th anniversary of my kidney transplant.

On March 10, 1995, I went on the kidney transplant waiting list only to be told that I would need to wait for 2 years for a transplant as I have B+ blood type. While this blood type is only found in 6% of the British population, 40-45% of South Asians are B+. I also discovered that South Asians have a 6-8 times higher probability of renal failure. The waiting list for kidneys in Britain then was over 5000.

I started peritoneal dialysis on March 14th and ten days later, on Saturday, March 25th, my wife and I were awoken by the telephone at 1:00AM from the hospital advising me that they had a kidney available for me and instructing me to come to the hospital as soon as possible. I received my transplant that same morning at 8:00AM. It took the kidney 10 days to start working and those were ten long and tense days.

Against all odds, God provided in a most miraculous way. It is a new lease of life that He has given to me and I realise I am living on borrowed time.

I was one of the fortunate ones who have been able to enjoy the benefits of a normal life with a transplant. Let me share with you how this transplant has transformed my life over the past 10 years.

My family: I am married to Celia and have 2 sons, Arun aged 17 and Sanjay, aged 15. We are a very closely-knit family and have enjoyed growing up together. My health has allowed me to take care of my family in every respect, including financially. Without my transplant, I would have had to rely on state benefits or my wife would have had to go back to work during the formative childhood years. We have been able to enjoy travelling abroad to visit family and friends around the world including Japan, China, Tunisia, Dubai, and the US.

My work: The kidney transplant has given me all the energy I need to do my work. I am a management-training consultant who has been able to train some 2,000 people over the past 10 years and speak at conferences and seminars all around the world. I am also actively involved in raising funds for a number of charitable causes, mostly in South Asia for health, development and education projects. I have had the opportunity to serve as a School Governor, Trustee of a major NHS Hospital Trust, a church leader and director of a number of companies over the past 10 years.

My passion: With good health, I have been able to continue to raise the awareness of kidney disease, transplantation and organ donation with a specific focus on South Asian communities. I have had the privilege of working with the National Kidney Research Fund, TIME Transplants in Mind and UK Transplant on a number of initiatives. Given my background, I have also had many opportunities of speaking to hundreds of South Asians from different backgrounds including Hindus, Muslims, Sikhs and Christians in temples, mosques, gurdwaras and churches.

Without a transplant the last 10 years would have been a very different story indeed, and one that I would probably not be writing.

The bad news is that there are still over 6,000 people waiting for a kidney transplant today. Some never get on to the transplant waiting list for a variety of reasons. Some 1,000 people die every year waiting for a transplant. I have met hundreds of people of all ages and backgrounds who have not had the privilege I have enjoyed.

The good news is that transplantation is now saving and transforming the lives of thousands of people. Sadly though, there are not enough donated organs for everyone who needs them. As a result we see six-year-olds having to be in hospital three times a week for up to 12 hours which brings tears to my eyes. They should be kicking a ball and enjoying life. It doesn’t have to be like this. Young mothers in their early 30s having to cope with bringing up 2 or more toddlers is an all-consuming task with the best of health. It is made all the more difficult having to cope with dialysis, hospital visits, and medication as well. It doesn’t have to he like this.

It is for all of us to take seriously the challenges faced by people with kidney disease every day.

How can you help?

  • Sign up to the Organ Donor Register and make your wishes known.
  • Consider live-related organ donation
  • Continue to raise the awareness of the need for organ donation and transplantation in schools, businesses, and community groups.
  • Speak about the issue openly – it is not a taboo subject

Together as we make a concerted effort between health professionals, communities and individuals, we have the solution to the problem in our hands. Only then will my story be able to be repeated by countless hundreds and thousands all over this country.

Deepak Mahtani
South Asian Development Partnership
www.southasian.org.uk/organdonation

Overview | Organ Shortages Critical | Information for the South Asian Community | Organs by Race?
Asian Attitudes to Organ Donation | Organ Donation and Transplantation - The Multi-Faith Perspective
Important Facts | Our Problem & Our Responsibility | Organs for Sale | One Man's Story
One Man's Story - Ten Years On | Anup Nahar's Story | Walk in Love and Hope
Living Transplants Reach All Time High | Ethnicity & Renal Failure: Disparity or Diversity
Early Management of Renal Failure: Prevention or Prevarication? | Asian Organ Donors Urgently Needed
Kidney Disease: the silent killer affecting YOU - and how to prevent it | The Body Snatchers
SADP Endorses PM'S Proposal for Presumed Consent for Organ Donation
Celebrities Back New Campaign To Urge Asian Communities To Join The NHS Organ Donor Register
New Book - 'Thankyou for Life' | SADP supports Healthtalkonline.org - organ donation & transplantation
   


 
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