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Overview | Organ Shortages Critical | Information for the South Asian Community | Organs by Race?
Asian Attitudes to Organ Donation | Organ Donation and Transplantation - The Multi-Faith Perspective
Important Facts | Our Problem & Our Responsibility | Organs for Sale | One Man's Story
One Man's Story - Ten Years On | Anup Nahar's Story | Walk in Love and Hope
Living Transplants Reach All Time High | Ethnicity & Renal Failure: Disparity or Diversity
Early Management of Renal Failure: Prevention or Prevarication? | Asian Organ Donors Urgently Needed
Kidney Disease: the silent killer affecting YOU - and how to prevent it | The Body Snatchers
SADP Endorses PM'S Proposal for Presumed Consent for Organ Donation
Celebrities Back New Campaign To Urge Asian Communities To Join The NHS Organ Donor Register
New Book - 'Thankyou for Life' | SADP supports Healthtalkonline.org - organ donation & transplantation

Information for the
South Asian Community


Did you know?
The number of Asian people on organ transplant waiting lists is growing rapidly

The need for organs in the Asian community is 3 to 4 times higher than that of the white community because diseases that can result in organ failure occur more often in the Asian population.

So how does this affect you?
Members of the Asian community are more likely to suffer from chronic illnesses such as diabetes and heart disease, which can lead to kidney and heart failure.  If this happens then patients may need a life-saving transplant.

However, at present the number of Asian patients waiting for transplants is growing, but not enough Asian people are becoming donors.

Life is all about give and take ...  and if, for some unfortunate reason you or a member of your family ever need a transplant then chances of acceptance and success of the transplant are greater if the donor is from your own ethnic group.

Many people have concerns and questions about organ donation and we'd like to take this opportunity to reassure you...


Faith
We are not aware of any Asian religion that does not allow donation.  In fact, over 3 years ago, the Muslim Law (Shariah) Council released a fatwa, stating that it is now acceptable for Muslims to donate organs after their death and to accept organs if they need them.  Likewise, other Asian religions such as Hinduism, Sikhism and Buddhism support the individuals' right to choose.

Family
In the event of death, doctors will not take organs from a patient without first discussing donation with the relatives, even if the patient carried a donorcard or was on the NHS Organ Donor Register.  This is why it is essential that people discuss the issues with their families and those closest to them.

Family members have told us that knowing their relative's wishes made it easier to agree to organ donation.


Fears
Many people are unaware of how the donation process is handled.   Addressing your concerns is our priority.

First of all doctors and nurses are trained  and committed to doing everything to save a life, and this will always be their priority.  Organ donation is only considered when death is inevitable.

Organs are only removed when two doctors, working independently, have carried out a series of strict tests to confirm brain stem death.  These doctors are not part of the transplant team and they have no connection with organ donation.

People may also have fears about the treatment of a patient's body after death.  Removal of organs is carried out with the same care and respect as any other operation.  The funeral will not be delayed.  Many families have told us that they have gained great comfort in donation at an otherwise very tragic time.


What to do
The most important thing to do is to tell those closest to you about your decision.

Carrying a donorcard and/or putting your name on the NHS Organ Donor Register confirms your decision to be a donor if the time ever comes.  The NHS Organ Donor Register is a computerised nation-wide, confidential list of people who are willing to become donors after their death.  The Register helps bring doctors and potential transplant patients together quickly.

Remember ... above all, whether you carry a donorcard or are on the Register, you must tell someone that you would like to be a donor if the time ever comes.


A leaflet is available in Gujarati, Punjabi, Urdu, Hindi, and Bengali as well as English. For more information please contact the Organ Donor Line on 0845 60 60 400 or visit www.uktransplant.org.uk.


Overview | Organ Shortages Critical | Information for the South Asian Community | Organs by Race?
Asian Attitudes to Organ Donation | Organ Donation and Transplantation - The Multi-Faith Perspective
Important Facts | Our Problem & Our Responsibility | Organs for Sale | One Man's Story
One Man's Story - Ten Years On | Anup Nahar's Story | Walk in Love and Hope
Living Transplants Reach All Time High | Ethnicity & Renal Failure: Disparity or Diversity
Early Management of Renal Failure: Prevention or Prevarication? | Asian Organ Donors Urgently Needed
Kidney Disease: the silent killer affecting YOU - and how to prevent it | The Body Snatchers
SADP Endorses PM'S Proposal for Presumed Consent for Organ Donation
Celebrities Back New Campaign To Urge Asian Communities To Join The NHS Organ Donor Register
New Book - 'Thankyou for Life' | SADP supports Healthtalkonline.org - organ donation & transplantation
   


 
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