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Overview | Organ Shortages Critical | Information for the South Asian Community | Organs by Race?
Asian Attitudes to Organ Donation | Organ Donation and Transplantation - The Multi-Faith Perspective
Important Facts | Our Problem & Our Responsibility | Organs for Sale | One Man's Story
One Man's Story - Ten Years On | Anup Nahar's Story | Walk in Love and Hope
Living Transplants Reach All Time High | Ethnicity & Renal Failure: Disparity or Diversity
Early Management of Renal Failure: Prevention or Prevarication? | Asian Organ Donors Urgently Needed
Kidney Disease: the silent killer affecting YOU - and how to prevent it | The Body Snatchers
SADP Endorses PM'S Proposal for Presumed Consent for Organ Donation
Celebrities Back New Campaign To Urge Asian Communities To Join The NHS Organ Donor Register
New Book - 'Thankyou for Life' | SADP supports Healthtalkonline.org - organ donation & transplantation

Important Facts

You may not know...

The option of donation after death can be extended beyond organ donation, to a much larger group of donors who can give tissues.  For example, corneas can restore sight and heart valves can save lives through their use in the treatment of heart disease.

The great majority of transplant operations use organs from people who have died.  However, a living relative or, in certain circumstances, a living unrelated person can, if fit, donate one of their kidneys, and in rare cases, donate part of their liver, lung or bowel without unacceptable risk to their own health.

Further advice on this can be sought from you own healthcare professionals.

Important facts about organ donation

  • Nearly 3,000 organs are transplanted  in this country each year.
  • As well as life-saving operations, over 2,000 sight-saving corneal transplants are carried out each year.
  • As medicine and technology advance, the types of organs that can be transplanted have increased.  As well as heart, liver and kidney, doctors can also transplant organs such as lung, pancreas and small bowel. 
  • There is no maximum age for some donations, so healthcare professionals will make a decision on each individual case.
  • Having an existing medical condition does not necessarily prevent a person from becoming a donor.  Again, the decision will be taken by a healthcare professional at the time of death.    
Overview | Organ Shortages Critical | Information for the South Asian Community | Organs by Race?
Asian Attitudes to Organ Donation | Organ Donation and Transplantation - The Multi-Faith Perspective
Important Facts | Our Problem & Our Responsibility | Organs for Sale | One Man's Story
One Man's Story - Ten Years On | Anup Nahar's Story | Walk in Love and Hope
Living Transplants Reach All Time High | Ethnicity & Renal Failure: Disparity or Diversity
Early Management of Renal Failure: Prevention or Prevarication? | Asian Organ Donors Urgently Needed
Kidney Disease: the silent killer affecting YOU - and how to prevent it | The Body Snatchers
SADP Endorses PM'S Proposal for Presumed Consent for Organ Donation
Celebrities Back New Campaign To Urge Asian Communities To Join The NHS Organ Donor Register
New Book - 'Thankyou for Life' | SADP supports Healthtalkonline.org - organ donation & transplantation
   


 
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